What I did after 9/11

Back in September 2001, I was a librarian at the SUNY Morrisville College Library.  On September 11, I was working the evening shift at the library.  I had first heard of what happened while at a doctor’s appointment that morning.  When I got to work, the library staff decided we needed to provide a safe and welcoming spot for our students and staff.  We had a large number of students from the greater NYC metro area.  That night is now a blur to me but I immediately went to work on an area on our website to post resources and links to support our community.  The set of pages I created is now archived as part of the Library of Congress September 11, 2001 Web Archive.  The pages I created were first posted on the library’s website on September 11, 2001 and continued with updates  until December 2001.  The link takes you to the 7 snapshots archived at the Library of Congress.  All of the links work and point to other archived sites within the collection.

For many days on those pages I had the following posted under “Food for Thought” —

“We should pray for the victims and the families of those who have been hurt or murdered in these crazy acts. We should also pray that America does not return to “business as usual,” but rather turns to a period of reflection, coming back into touch with our common humanity, asking ourselves how our institutions can best embody our highest values. We may need a global day of atonement and repentance dedicated to finding a way to turn the direction of our society at every level, a return to the notion that every human life is sacred, that “the bottom line” should be the creation of a world of love and caring, and that the best way to prevent these kinds of acts is not to turn ourselves into a police state, but turn ourselves into a society in which social justice, love, and compassion are so prevalent that violence becomes only a distant memory.”
Rabbi Michael Lerner, Editor TIKKUN Magazine
Complete article at: http://www.tikkun.org/index.cfm/action/current/article/52.html

What did you do?

AARP Fraud Map

I have been a member of AARP for several years.  One of the best services they offer is actually free for anyone to view.  It is part of their Fraud Watch Network efforts to AARP Fraud Watchexpose scams and fraud across the country usually perpetrated online and via telephones calls.  The AARP Fraud Map is available for all to see and use.

Go to https://action.aarp.org/site/SPageNavigator/FraudMap.html

Scam-Tracking Map

No matter where you live, fraud is never far away. But you can protect yourself by knowing what to watch out for — and by telling others when you’ve spotted a scam. Search the map to learn more about scams reported by people just like you. And use the pull-down menu to read law enforcement alerts.