AARP Fraud Watch Network:

Got this from AARP Fraud Watch Network today.
Are You at Risk for Investment Fraud?

Dear Wilfred,

Investment fraud schemes cost Americans tens of billions of dollars a year. AARP has identified eight risk factors that predict who is most likely to be defrauded.

What You Should Know:
While no one factor causes someone to be scammed, our research found that these eight factors raise one’s risk of being defrauded:

  1. Male gender
  2. High annual trading frequency (five or more a year)
  3. Frequent solicitations by phone, email, and regular mail
  4. Frequent remote investing in response to TV, email, or phone calls
  5. A mindset that wealth is an important measure of success in life
  6. A mindset that unregulated investments are more profitable
  7. A world view that is described as conservative
  8. Older age
What you should do to avoid investment fraud:
  • Only invest with registered advisors and investments
  • Put yourself on the Do Not Call registry (www.donotcall.gov)
  • Get a telephone call blocking system to screen out potential scammers
  • Limit the amount of personal information you give to sales people until you verify their credentials
  • Don’t make an investment decision based on a TV ad, a phone call or an email
  • Don’t make any investment decisions under stress
  • Take AARP’s Investment Fraud Vulnerability Quiz to find out if you are at risk
Please share this alert with friends and family!

Sincerely,

Kristin Keckeisen
Fraud Watch Network

P.S. Spotted a scam?  Tell us about it.  Our scam-tracking map gives you information about the latest scams targeting people in your state.  You’ll also find first-hand accounts from scam-spotters who are sharing their experiences so you know how to protect yourself and your family.

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From AARP: Identity Theft: Who’s At Risk?

Identity Theft: Who’s At Risk?
Source: AARP Research

This AARP Fraud Watch Network study aimed to assess Americans’ habits around protecting their personal and financial information. Overall, the study finds that many are not taking precautions necessary to reduce their risk of identity theft.